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I keep thinking about the recent line of U.S. Supreme Court campaign finance cases that limit corruption to "quid pro quo" situations. A few months ago, I wrote a blog post explaining that the Court's picture of campaign finance as about political beliefs is not how things work at the local level, where politics is more about power and spoils than about beliefs. But the "quid pro quo" view of corruption is problematic in other ways.

One problem is that this view involves only one kind of corruption:  personal corruption. It is relevant only to situations where one individual wants a candidate or official to do something very specific in return for a campaign contribution. This is a problem, but it is not the principal problem in campaign finance.

Is it appropriate for a mayor — especially a mayor in a city with strict gift rules and a public campaign financing program that has strict campaign contribution limits — to work with an organization that lobbies the state on behalf of his policies and sponsors ads and materials that support his views and, especially, celebrate his successes?

This is the situation in New York City, where Bill de Blasio, in his first year in office, is being celebrated by an entity called Campaign for One New York (CONY), which announced yesterday its expenditures and contributors (in keeping with de Blasio's support of transparency, it went well beyond the requirement of disclosing contributors of over $5,000).

An excellent editorial yesterday by Dan Barton, editor of the Kingston (NY) Times, raises a few important issues relating to local government ethics proceedings.

According to Barton, Kingston's new ethics board dismissed a complaint from a city alderman that the mayor had violated the ethics code by hiring as an attorney for the city's local development corporation a lawyer with whom the mayor practiced as "of counsel."

The Speech or Debate Clause of the U.S. Constitution protects activities within the "legislative sphere" from being heard outside the legislature, and prevents the introduction of evidence of legislative activity in any such hearing. A recent brief from the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee in S.E.C. v. Ways and Means Committee argues (on pp. 30, 34-37) that communications between industry lobbyists and the staff director of the committee's subcommittee on health are privileged and may not be subpoenaed by the SEC in an investigation of alleged insider trading-related leaks.

Garbage is the principal regular point of contact between individuals and their local government. If people are happy with their garbage pickup, they are likely to be happy with their local government. For this reason, smart high-level local government officials make sure that garbage pickup is done well.

In Chicago, the members of the board of aldermen wanted to be given credit for garbage pickup. They also wanted to use it as a way to provide their supporters with jobs. To do this meant ward control over garbage collection and a garbage collection map based on wards, not on what was most efficient. This meant more trucks and more employees, more votes for incumbents, and more costs for taxpayers.

According to an article last week in the Washington Post, the Fairfax County (VA) Attorney fired one of his office's assistant attorneys because she was elected to the council of a city within the county, even though he and his deputy who deals with personnel matters had given her permission to run for office. In a letter sent after the election, the county attorney explained the apparent contradiction as follows:
“I apologize if you were misled by the apparent ambiguity. I have never disputed that [Virginia law] bars localities from prohibiting its employees from participating in political activities…There is no right, however, under the First Amendment or otherwise that guarantees that an attorney can hold public office.”
In other words, you can run for office, but you can't win. However, it's not a First Amendment issue, it's a statutory issue. Section 15.2-1512.2 of the Code of Virginia expressly allows local government employees to participate in “political activities” as long as they are out of uniform, on their own time, and are not trying to use their position to solicit donations or support. Included in the definition of “political activities” is “becoming a political candidate.” Any reasonable interpretation of this would include winning an election. The only question is whether the office won may be within the county, at least with respect to an assistant county attorney.