making local government more ethical

You are here

In the news

DonMc

Carla Miller, Founder and President of City Ethics, is starting a Network fellowship at Harvard’s Safra Center for Ethics.

Today, her first blog post was published on the Safra Center’s website:
The post, titled “The Emperor’s New Clothes -- A View into the Current State of Municipal Ethics", describes the various types of municipal ethics...

cmiller

City Ethics president, Carla Miller, worked with Integrity Florida (Dan Krassner) and the Florida Alliance for Retired Americans (Richard Polangin) on a Resolution that passed at the annual conference of the Alliance last week. This is part of an emerging citizen initiative in Florida that involves numerous groups joining forces to fight for the passage of...

DonMc

What’s missing from new Jacksonville ethics office? Money

No budget or staff yet, despite being adopted by City Council last summer.

Posted: January 17, 2012

Seven months after it was signed into law, Jacksonville’s Office of Ethics, Compliance and Oversight still has no budget. Its one employee, a director appointed last month, works part-time but hasn’t drawn a city paycheck since leaving an earlier job in October. She’s

...
This Editorial ran in June after the passing of a comprehensive package of ethics reform bills in the Jacksonville City Coucil.

Ethics: This progress was historic

Posted:June 19, 2011

Jacksonville residents have this self-image that we have a progressive government. But consolidation was more than 40 years ago.

In creating a strong culture of ethics in city government, Jacksonville has been left behind - until now.

DonMc
Update: The bill (2010-616) was passed unanimously by the Finance Committee on Tuesday, leaving it on the consent agenda for next Tuesday's full City of Jacksonville Council meeting: 11/23/2010 @ 5pm


There was an excellent editorial published in the Jacksonville Times Union on Saturday, Nov. 13th which focused on the City of Jacksonville's current legislation 2010-616 being considered by...
Robert Wechsler
Updates: August 4 and 9, 2010 (see below)
I was just saying to someone the other day that the worst offenses in local government ethics do not involve money. The worst offenses in local government ethics involve intimidation, which causes people to lose their peace of mind, their reputations, and the feeling that they may participate in their local government, things no amount of money can buy. And yet it is the rare ethics complaint or arrest that primarily involves intimidation...

Pages